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Forza Horizon 4 | Series 17 Update

John Schommer
Thursday, December 19, 2019

The Series 17 update for Forza Horizon 4 arrived on December 12th. With it came the long-awaited return of Toyota and the 1997 Toyota Supra RZ for starters. That wasn’t all though. A garage full of Renault favorites hits the game as reward cars as well as the much-missed muscle of the 1970 Mercury Cougar Eliminator. The Eliminator is also the name of the latest game mode to come to Forza Horizon 4. It’s an amazing battle royale of racing that must be experienced to believe. If that’s not enough there are also a couple showcase remixes that are worth a run.

 

The Eliminator

 

“The Eliminator” is an all-new game mode free to all players that brings battle royale to Forza Horizon 4. Up to 72 players face off in the open world of Britain within a set arena boundary, eliminating one another in head-to-head races to earn new upgrades and a chance to pick up rare Car Drops. Arena walls contract throughout the game, forcing players closer together until a final white-knuckle race among the survivors determines the winner.

 

 

1998 Toyota Supra RZ

The Toyota Supra always towed a fine line between Japanese luxury and performance. It ticked all the boxes that JDM fans could list and it found fame and fortune on the big screen. At the heart of this beautiful, easily able to turn beast, is the JDM lover’s heartthrob, the 2JZ-GTE. It’s a motor that by itself is the stuff of legend and with a little massaging can readily generate tons of sonorous horsepower. What we have here is the top of the line model from the last year of production (in the U.S.). The fourth generation of the Supra was unmatched in appeal and resale values have soared. In an age where RWD luxury sport coupes from Japan are a dying breed, the Supra RZ lives on to stand tall against anything that dares to step to its considerable gait.

 

1970 Mercury Cougar Eliminator

The 1970 Mercury Cougar Eliminator is a big bruiser of a cat from the height of the muscle car craze, building off of the successful pony car formula of the Cougar’s little brother, the Mustang. The functional ram-air intake on the hood barely hides a massive, NASCAR-inspired 428 Super Cobra Jet engine. Like many muscle cars of the era, the Eliminator’s engine was seriously underrated by Mercury, and the 428 big-block was good for more than 400 horsepower right out of the box. Nearly too much for the street, it is hard to miss the Eliminator's bold spoiler, blacked-out grille and headlight covers, and eye-searing color combinations like Competition Orange and Lime Green. The Eliminator was the vision of Larry Shinoda, whose work had previously inspired the ’63 Corvette Stingray and who was the father of the Boss 302 Mustang. The Eliminator is a real threat at stoplights or on the track, so when an Eliminator looms in your rear-view mirror, you’d best get out of the way.

 

 

2017 Alpine A110

It’s pronounced “Al-peen,” and named for the type of driving Alpine founder Jean Rédélé designed his cars to be adept at. It’s been 24 years since the last Alpine A610 rolled off the assembly line. The new A110 was designed from the ground up with a primary goal in mind: Lightness. Throughout the A110, from its all-aluminum body and all-aluminum chassis to the integrated components, it delivers weight savings, agility, and efficiency. Less than 2,500 pounds, with a rear/mid-engine places the Alpine squarely facing tough competitors like the Porsche Cayman or Audi TT. Hit the mountain roads and find out if Colin Chapman is still right in saying “Simplify, then add lightness.” Alpine is banking he was.

 

 

2007 Renault Clio RS 197

While it’s a bit of a stretch to directly compare a screaming F1 car with a hot hatch like the little Clio, Renault tries hard to inject a bit of the excitement of their F1 program into the RS 197. Take the rear blown diffuser—it’s unlikely that the Clio will need its downforce, but it definitely looks exciting. The RS 197 has several aero tweaks like this, and suffice it to say that their main impact is visual—they do look great. While actual on-track performance can’t quite compare to an open-wheeler, the near 200-horsepower naturally aspirated 2-liter engine under the hood is responsive and downright fun in such a small car. It may sound clichéd, but the Clio’s performance can only be compared to a go-kart, with sharp and nimble handling and few bad habits. Chuck the RS 197 hard into a corner and instead of drama, the Renault hunkers down and powers through. Renault’s many years of experience hotting-up Clios, from the legendary Clio Williams to the various RS models that followed, show through in this ultimate version of the third-generation car.

 

 

2008 Renault Megane R26.R

There are a couple ways to tell that a car model is built for the track. One is when you can order it with an optional roll cage. Second, but no less important and even more impressive, is when the car has recorded the fastest lap in its class around the infamous Nürburgring. The Megane R26.R can claim both. At eight minutes, seventeen seconds it was the fastest front-wheel production car in 2008. There were only 450 models built as the extreme version of the popular Megane, turning the already quick Renault Sport 230 F1 Team R26 into true compact track weaponry.

 

 

2016 Renault Clio R.S. 16 Concept

Is it stripped down due to the lack of air-conditioning and a back seat, or is it loaded since it’s packed with performance from the Renault parts bin? Disregarding the semantics and getting straight to the spec sheet delivers a clearer judgement. Renault has taken the 271-horsepower turbo four-cylinder from the Megane RS 275 Trophy-R model, along with key suspension and braking components and then stuffed them into the small package of the Clio. With the appropriate flare of the Clio Cup rear diffuser, a stout aero kit and actual flares to contain the massive 19-inch wheels this Concept has properly celebrates the 40th anniversary of the much-loved RS model.

 

 

2018 Renault Megane R.S

If you are lucky enough to be familiar with the Megane RS line of hot hatches you know they just keep getting better. Among its brethren, they have been known for plenty of front-wheel-drive powered fun, and the chassis and suspension stability to put that power to good use. Among the competition, many Europeans (Renault cars are not sold in the U.S.) would argue the Megane R.S. is the best when compared to cars like the Honda Civic Type-R or Ford Focus RS. Whether you agree or not, it’s undoubtedly in the same class as these heraldic hot hatches. That alone should make it worth a drive.

 

 

Showcase Remix Redux - Nine & Three Quarters

 

It's your chance to race a Ford Anglia against the Flying Scotsman once again. Even though it can't actually fly, you'll still need to get in some good jumps and jostle with the iconic train on a run in toward Edinburgh!

 

Showcase Remix Redux - Contest of Giants

 

Go toe-to-toe with Horizon's hovercraft pilot once more! You'll be driving the Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 during a spring downpour. Come hill or high water, prove once again that tradition is king! Complete the regular version of The Behemoth Showcase first to unlock the remixed version.

 

For more on the fixes coming to the Series 17 update, please see the Series 17 Release Notes on the Forza Support site